Sclerotherapy

Varicose veins
Varicose Vein Treatment

Sclerotherapy

Ultrasound Guided Foam Sclerotherapy involves the injecting of a solution – a chemical agent known as a sclerosant- to eliminate varicose veins through blood vessel scarring and closure. Sclerotherapy has long been used in medicine for more than 150 years. Medical advances has seen the comeback of sclerotherapy due to the advent of duplex ultrasound and foam sclerosants. It is an effective and simple treatment for varicose veins.

With foam sclerotherapy the liquid sclerosant is mixed with air to create a foam. Under ultrasound guidance it is injected into the varicose vein, displacing the blood within the vein, filling it with the sclerosant. As a result the vein spasms and scars. The vein is then checked with the ultrasound to measure the success of the injection.

Ultrasound guided sclerotherapy improves the accuracy, safety and efficiency when treating large varicose veins. Veins can be accurately mapped with the help of the ultrasound which helps direct the needle tip to the targeted vein. The sclerosant is then injected into the vein through ongoing monitoring which also aids Dr Altaf control the injection’s direction.

Foam Sclerotherapy
Success Rate

There is a good success rate with foam sclerotherapy as 80-90% of veins remaining shut after three years. Veins may need to be re-injected to improve the success rate. Early recurrence is monitored through regular ultrasound surveillance.

Possible complications

There are risks involved with any medical procedure, however Dr Altaf will work with you to ensure that these are minimal. Complications can include:

Micro Sclerotherapy
Success Rate

Micro Sclerotherapy can be used to treat the skin’s visible surface veins referred to as reticular veins and telangiectasias. Treatment involves injecting a sclerosant or chemical agent, to induce blood vessel scarring and closure.

There is a good success rate with liquid micro sclerotherapy as 60 – 70% of veins remaining closed after one year. Veins may need to be re-injected to improve the success rate. To prevent flaring, treatments need to be spaced out by 6-8 weeks.

Possible complications